Reviews

The-Western-Cemetery-of-Roman-Cirencester

Review – The Western Cemetery of Roman Cirencester, 2011-2015

Archaeology always retains the power to surprise. The site of Cirencester’s western cemetery, much developed and truncated over the years, ought to have retained few secrets, but the results of the excavation – 126 graves, a walled cemetery, deviant burials, an enamelled bronze cockerel, and a complete tombstone – exceeded expectations.

Humble-Works-for-Humble-People

Review – Humble Works for Humble People: a history of the fishery piers of County Galway and North Clare, 1800-1922

Humble Works for Humble People is a study of the structures associated with Galway and North Clare’s fishing industry: from ‘artisanal’ piers and slips to larger, more sophisticated ship and boat quays – built in large numbers from the early 19th century. It details the effects of wider, as well as more local, historical events on fishing and traditional occupations in the west of Ireland.

A-Gazetteer-of-Anglo-Saxon-and-Anglo-Scandinavian-Sites

Review – A Gazetteer of Anglo-Saxon & Anglo-Scandinavian Sites: Cambridgeshire & Northamptonshire

The reader needs to be aware of the author and his previous county-based gazetteers to know what this book covers. The subject matter is not broadly archaeological, as the ‘sites’ mentioned in the title are almost entirely churches with extant pre-Norman fabric, alongside carved stonework found in and around these structures. The only non-ecclesiastical/ monastic sites mentioned are the Cambridgeshire Dykes, the reserve collection of the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge, and a few objects from the Peterborough and St Neots museums.

Water-and-the-Environment-in-the-Anglo-Saxon-World

Review – Water and the Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World

Focusing not so much on marine environments (as the title might suggest) as on wetlands and inland waterways, this book is the latest addition to a series of multi-author volumes exploring the environment of the Anglo-Saxons. Rivers, marshes, landing places, and sacred springs were just some of the important watery places that existed in early medieval England. The nine chapters of this volume explore these features, focusing on some fairly well-researched topics, such as inland waterways, towns, and fishing, and some less familiar ones, like water in Anglo-Saxon poetry and fenland frontiers.

Winchester

Review – Winchester: an archaeological assessment – St Swithun’s ‘City of Happiness and Good Fortune’

Winchester is a city with remarkable historical and archaeological roots. At various times playing a local, national, and international role, the city has been blessed with an unusual amount of attention in the 20th century when it comes to uncovering its past. Whether through schoolboy endeavours, private and municipal enterprise, a major research unit, or commercial organisations, a massive amount of activity has variously been funded, under-funded, and developer-funded – and so the resulting publication record is uneven.

Terracotta-Warriors,-World-Museum-©-Gareth-Jones-(21)

Review – Terracotta warriors

The tomb of China’s first emperor is renowned for its buried army of terracotta warriors. Lucia Marchini tours a new exhibition exploring the story behind these archaeological celebrities.

Geology-for-Archaeologists

Review – Geology for Archaeologists: a short introduction

Geological form and process fundamentally underpin archaeology, but many archaeologists only have a patchy understanding of it – or even a fear of the sedimentary unknown. John Allen’s book is therefore hugely welcome, and it fills a long-neglected gap.

Avebury-Soundscapes

Review – Avebury Soundscapes

This is an aural companion piece to Marshall’s lyrical photographic vision of the Neolithic landscape of ‘Greater Avebury’, as seen in his Exploring Avebury: The Essential Guide (see CA 322), Like that book, this is the work of an assured artist.

Public-Archaeology-and-Climate-Change

Review – Public Archaeology and Climate Change

This book collects 18 papers that were inspired by the themes and discussions of the ‘Engaging the public with archaeology threatened by climate change’ session at the 2015 European Association of Archaeology conference. A timely and challenging volume, its impressively international collection of authors highlights the complexity of defining not only climate change’s effect on archaeology, but also the very notions of ‘heritage’ and ‘public archaeology’, as well as how the three intersect.

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