Reviews

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Review – Twelfth-century Sculptural Sculptural Finds at Canterbury Cathedral

As a mere ‘worked stone specialist’, it was with some trepidation that I took on the task of reviewing a book dealing with matters striking at the very heart of Romanesque art scholarship. The Medieval Academy of America saw the establishment of a largely female tradition of American scholarship, of which this book’s author, Professor Malone, is a part.

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Review – Ruins and Follies of East Anglia

This is a book you will want in your pocket if you are going for a stroll in East Anglia. Through his writing, Edward Couzens-Lake – a passionate explorer of Norwich – accompanies the reader to 45 sites, each of which is given a concise historical description and photographs.

Historic-landscapes

Review – Historic Landscapes and Mental Well-being

As the title of this book suggests, historic landscapes have the potential to improve the lives of those experiencing mental ill-health, by exploring the therapeutic relationship between people and ancient places.

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Review – The Pilgrimages of Hadrian’s Wall 1849-2019: a history

The decennial Pilgrimage of Hadrian’s Wall is an act of veneration for the most-substantial Roman monument in Britain, and the outstanding frontier-work of the Roman Empire. Professionals and amateurs mingle, travel the Wall, and hear and discuss the latest discoveries. It is a highly convivial occasion. A book is issued, charting the previous decade’s research. Following the pattern of the 1999 book, the most recent (2019) publication, edited by Rob Collins and Matt Symonds, is the essential means of keeping up with what is new on the Wall

Beau-Street

Review – The Beau Street, Bath Hoard

This new volume tells the fascinating story of a hoard of 17,660 Roman coins discovered during an archaeological excavation in Bath city centre in 2007 (see CA 278). Although it is not one of the largest hoards to be found from Roman Britain, its careful recovery and subsequent micro-excavation at the British Museum mean that it is now one of its most interesting.

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Review – Into the Wildwoods: explore the Mesolithic in Scotland’s native woodlands

This teaching resource is a companion to 2019’s The First Foresters (see CA 350), which focuses on the Neolithic occupants of Scotland’s woodlands. Into the Wildwoods delves further back in time, introducing the hunter-gatherers of the later Mesolithic (c.5800-4000 BC) in a way that will engage 8- to 12-year-olds, while also incorporating ideas about the natural world around them.

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