Books

Public-Archaeology-and-Climate-Change

Review – Public Archaeology and Climate Change

This book collects 18 papers that were inspired by the themes and discussions of the ‘Engaging the public with archaeology threatened by climate change’ session at the 2015 European Association of Archaeology conference. A timely and challenging volume, its impressively international collection of authors highlights the complexity of defining not only climate change’s effect on archaeology, but also the very notions of ‘heritage’ and ‘public archaeology’, as well as how the three intersect.

Hillforts-of-the-Cheshire-Ridge

Review – Hillforts of the Cheshire Ridge

Despite a history of study stretching back to the early 19th century, the hillforts of Cheshire have figured little in discussions of the British Iron Age. This new volume details the results of the Habitats and Hillforts Landscape Partnership Project, funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund. Although centred on landscape management, this project enabled new archaeological fieldwork to be conducted on six hillforts situated along Cheshire’s Sandstone Ridge.

A-Life-in-Norfolk's-Archaeology

Review – A Life in Norfolk’s Archaeology, 1950-2016

Peter Wade-Martins’ account of his life in archaeology is as rich as any of the sites with which he has been involved. Beginning at a time when there was scant legal protection for Britain’s heritage, and ending with the realities of developer-led archaeology and a post-Brexit future, Wade-Martins’ story is also the story of archaeological practice in the modern era.

King-Arthur

Review – Arthur and the Kings of Britain: the historical truth behind the myths

The two great medieval histories of the British people, those by Geoffrey of Monmouth and Nennius, have long been dismissed as fantasy. But among such tales as the arrival of the Trojan Brutus, the slaying of the giant Gogmagog, and the 12 battles of Arthur, the last of the British kings, might there be elements of truth?

Stonehenge---the-story-so-far

Review – Stonehenge: the story so far

Julian Richards makes no apology ‘for adding one more item to the extensive literature of Stonehenge’ as he offers the revision of his 2007 book to be this year’s Stonehenge autumn annual.

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