Books

Quarrying-in-Cumbria

Review – Quarrying in Cumbria

This small but fascinating book tells the story of quarrying, or ‘stone-getting’, in Cumbria, from prehistoric to modern times. David Johnson uses photographs accompanied by extended captions to reveal how slate, granite, limestone, clay, and gypsum were extracted from rock faces or dug out of the ground.

Freshwater-Fish-in-England

Review – Freshwater Fish in England

This book provides an eminently readable overview of freshwater fishing, redressing the focus on sea fishing that has dominated archaeological narratives in recent years. The author is a leading fish-bone specialist, so there is mention of archaeological data, including isotopic analyses of human bones as proxies for diet.

Finds-Identified

Review – Finds Identified

This new book, Finds Identified, is a chunky volume celebrating the rich material culture of England and Wales. Brimming with information on archaeological objects dating from the prehistoric to the modern period, it is richly illustrated with images from the online database of the Portable Antiquities Scheme (PAS).

Lime-Kilns

Lime Kilns: history and heritage

Whether you are an academic reviewing the history of lime kilns across Britain or simply an enthusiast who is interested in understanding more about how your local lime kiln functioned and how it fits into the wider historic landscape, this book is an easy and enjoyable read. David Johnson’s passion, knowledge, and enthusiasm for these historic structures is evident throughout.

Clifton-Quarry,-Worcestershire

Clifton Quarry, Worcestershire: pits, pots and cereals

Clifton Quarry is a key site for the prehistory of the West Midlands. The outstanding discovery was an early Iron Age settlement, dating from a short period in the 6th to 4th centuries BC, consisting of numerous four-post structures, but curiously with no clear evidence for roundhouses. Charred grain and charcoal from the post-holes of the four-posters suggest that they burnt down and supports the idea that such structures were granaries.

London's-Crypts-&-Catacombs

London’s Crypts and Catacombs

Asked to think about catacombs, our minds might initially turn to the grand subterranean ossuaries of, say, Rome or Paris. However, London is not without its own underground burial places. In this brief but enjoyable book, authors Robert Bard and Adrian Miles take readers on a tour of former and extant catacombs and other hidden structures within and below some of the best-known cemeteries in the capital.

Unearthing-Childhood-

Unearthing Childhood: young lives in prehistory

Robin Derricourt’s book is an overview of current and past research on the nature of the evidence for children in prehistory. As he points out, children are likely to have comprised about 50% of the population of most prehistoric societies, and so it is high time they were studied to the same degree as adults.

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