Category: Articles

Lanton Quarry: New evidence in northern Northumberland

A routine investigation ahead of gravel quarrying has turned up some exciting results: has the ‘support centre’ for the elite Anglo-Saxon settlement of Yeavering been found? Clive Waddington discusses the evidence. In the very north of Northumberland lies an old, dried-out glacial lake that is surrounded by raised gravel terraces, known as the Milfield Basin. […]

Magic and Mining at Alderley Edge

Listening to tales told by his blacksmith grandfather in the semi-darkness of his fire-lit forge, Alan Garner absorbed the Cheshire folklore that he then transformed into a classic work of fiction — The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. Inspired by Garner’s story, archaeologists have recently begun to unravel the truth behind the legends of Alderley Edge, as […]

Magic and Mining; the Alderly Edge Landscape Project

Listening to the tales told by his blacksmith grandfather in the semi-darkness of his fire-lit forge, Alan Garner absorbed the Cheshire folklore that transformed into a classic work of fiction – The Weirdstone of Brisingamen. Inspirred by Garner’s story archaeologists have recently begun to unravel the truth behind the legends of Alderly edge, as Chris […]

Archaeology Awards

  Last year in Cardiff, we launched the Current Archaeology Awards to resounding success. We’re excited to open this year’s competition and look forward to your votes  — just  CLICK HERE; these awards are our way of hearing back from all of you who have helped to make CA such a great success over the […]

Ice Age: archaeology and the climatic rollercoaster

We still live in the Ice Age that began around 2.5 million years ago. Our present time is an ‘interglacial’: a relatively warm period between two big freezes. Global warming looks set to change the pattern forever. In this major feature, we examine the new book by Brian Fagan and review the latest findings of […]

Bamburgh Castle: digging the home of Northumbria's kings

The Bamburgh Research Project is picking up the pieces of the archaeological work started by legendary eccentric Dr Brian Hope-Taylor, who had left virtually no record of his excavations — or so it was believed. The story of Bamburgh is two-fold: before properly investigating the site, the team must first excavate the archaeologist who worked […]

The End of Roman Verulamium

Landmark excavations at St Albans in 1955-1961 transformed ideas about Late Roman towns. Excavator Sheppard Frere claimed that urban life continued well into the 5th century AD. Now, Neil Faulkner and David Neal’s fresh study of old records is re-dating the discoveries and reversing the conclusions.

Bluestonehenge: Landscape of ancestors

The Stonehenge story continues to evolve: a whole new chapter has just been added after the remarkable discovery this summer of a second bluestone circle, located at the point where the Avenue joins the River Avon. Chris Catling reports.

The Hallaton Treasure: evidence of a new kind of shrine?

In CA 233 we reported on the discovery at Hallaton, in Leicestershire, of a rare Roman cavalry parade helmet. It was just one of a number of items of treasure found at a pre-Roman shrine that continues to excite debate. Frank Hargrave, Project Officer at the Harborough Museum describes the other finds.

Water-power in Medieval Greenwich

Last summer, digging through 3.5m of riverside mud at Greenwich in London, archaeologists uncovered the remains of a huge timber watermill of the 12th century. The wheel, part of which survived, would have been more than 5m across. We report on an extraordinary example of Medieval engineering for industrial-scale production.