Articles

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The problem of the Picts

The Picts are a fascinating but archaeologically elusive people who thrived in parts of Scotland in the 4th to 10th centuries AD. What has recent research added to this often obscure picture? Gordon Noble reports.

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X-ray analysis of chainmail from the Mary Rose

Analysis by X-ray of three copper-alloy artefacts recovered from the wreck of the Mary Rose has offered new insight into their construction and the success of conservation efforts undertaken on them. 

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Bronze Age burials at Lechlade skatepark

Archaeological investigations in Lechlade-on-Thames, Gloucestershire, have revealed two very unusual Bronze Age burials in an extensive ceremonial landscape spanning many phases of prehistory.

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Review – Time Team’s Dig Village

If there was one thing that Time Team excelled at during its 25-year run, it was bringing communities together to share in the story of their local area. And it is community that lies at the heart of this new book by the popular archaeology TV programme’s creator and series producer, Tim Taylor. Beautifully illustrated, it offers a comprehensive how-to guide for learning more about the area where you live.

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Review – London’s Lost Rivers: a walker’s guide – volume two

In this second volume of London’s Lost Rivers, Tom Bolton presents the history of the city along nine of its more obscure rivers. Through the suggested walks along the routes of rivers such as Bollo Brook, Counters Creek, and Black Ditch, which once ran through the city but are now lost or buried underground, readers are able to follow the development of the landscape over time.

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Review – Exploring Megalithic Europe

In this new publication, Julian Heath presents a guide to the impressive stone structures created in the Neolithic, Chalcolithic, and Bronze Age, which dominate landscapes in many parts of Europe, bringing to life the world of the prehistoric people who once inhabited them.

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Review – Manufactured Bodies: the impact of industrialisation on London health

Forged from a project funded by the City of London Archaeological Trust, this volume weaves together archaeological, historical, and modern-day public health data, resulting in an impressive resource for understanding the health of Londoners past and present. Focusing on data collected from human skeletal remains of nearly 2,400 individuals from 24 pre-industrial (1066–1750) and industrial (1750–1900) sites across Britain, it implements cutting-edge digital radiographic and computerised tomography (CT) analysis on an unprecedented scale.

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Review – A Prehistoric Burial Mound and Anglo-Saxon Cemetery at Barrow Clump, Salisbury Plain, Wiltshire: English Heritage and Operation Nightingale excavations 2003-14

Excavations at Barrow Clump, Figheldean, by English Heritage in 2003–2004, were designed to ascertain the extent of damage to a round barrow caused by the activity of badgers. In this book, the illustrations alone, which depict the pre-barrow soil riddled with burrows, serve to emphasise that it was considerable. Further excavations, by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation and Wessex Archaeology in 2012–2014, aimed to alleviate damage to a series of Anglo-Saxon graves set around the barrow and, given the circumstances, the results are remarkable.

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Review – Twelfth-century Sculptural Sculptural Finds at Canterbury Cathedral

As a mere ‘worked stone specialist’, it was with some trepidation that I took on the task of reviewing a book dealing with matters striking at the very heart of Romanesque art scholarship. The Medieval Academy of America saw the establishment of a largely female tradition of American scholarship, of which this book’s author, Professor Malone, is a part.

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Science Notes – Bridging the gap in London’s prehistory

Over recent decades, developments in radiocarbon dating techniques have revolutionised our ability to establish the age of archaeological material and to interpret the past (see CA 359). In this month’s Science Notes we will be exploring how, thanks to further advances in this field, ‘the most significant group of Early Neolithic pottery ever uncovered in London’ has shed intriguing light on the capital’s prehistoric past.

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