Articles

Camp-kitchen-reconstruction-

Napoleonic-era field kitchens found on Guernsey

Archaeological work on L’Ancresse Common, Guernsey, has revealed that a number of earthworks which have long been believed to be Bronze Age burial mounds may, in fact, be the rare remains of Napoleonic-era military camp kitchens. 

Hope-under-excavation

Roman settlement uncovered near Navio fort

Excavations in Derbyshire have uncovered the remains of a Roman settlement near the fort at Brough. The area is known to have a rich industrial and mining heritage, dating back to at least the Roman period, and it was hoped that the project would shed more light on Roman influence on the Peak District landscape.

Great-Orme-1

Great Orme’s golden age of European trade

A Bronze Age copper mine in North Wales is likely to have been the site of Britain’s first mining boom, with a ‘golden age’ of production between c.1600 and 1400 BC seeing its copper travel as far as Brittany and the Baltic, new research suggests.

The-Lost-Shrine

Review – The Lost Shrine

Archaeological sleuths Clare Hills, David Barbrook, and Margaret Bockford return in Nicola Ford’s cleverly constructed crime novel, a sequel to The Hidden Bones (see CA 340). This latter book featured a research dig on a barrow cemetery, but its successor dives into the world of commercial archaeology.

Small-Change

Review – Small Change: a history of everyday coinage

The production and use of coinage are closely tied to many other aspects of social history, as is demonstrated in this accessible and engaging book. Focusing on smaller denominations, both those produced officially and the ingenious local responses to a lack of small change, it presents an overview of the development of money around the world, before discussing the story in Britain in detail.

Shielings_Arran

Science Notes – Survey on the Isle of Arran

For this month’s Science Notes, we will be exploring a technology that is mentioned frequently in the pages of CA, and which, in a recent survey of the Isle of Arran, off the west coast of Scotland, has allowed hundreds of previously unknown sites of archaeological interest to be discovered.

Mons-Graupius

Review – The Romans in Scotland and the Battle of Mons Graupius

This book offers an alternative view on the well-trodden path of attempting to identify the site of the fabled last stand of the Caledonii. Offering a new analysis of the earliest Roman invasion, Forder re-examines the extent of the occupation, arguing that the dating of some sites is flawed, and suggesting possible locations for the battle.

Living-off-the-Land

Review – Living off the Land: agriculture in Wales c.400-1600 AD

This important publication is the first study of medieval agriculture in Wales to be produced in many years, and as such offers a valuable contribution to a subject that has been far less comprehensively written about than it has in England and Ireland. It sheds more light on the relationship between agricultural development and wider social and political change in Wales during this period.

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