News

09 Duiker RCE bij scheepswrak de Rooswijk tijdens de verkenning in 2016

Rescuing the Rooswijk

An international team of maritime archaeologists is working to excavate and record the remains of the Rooswijk, an at-risk Dutch wreck off the coast of Kent. The vessel was built in Amsterdam for the Dutch East India Company in 1737, but sank on the treacherous Goodwin Sands in 1740 while sailing for Batavia (modern Jakarta). […]

Unusual Bronze Age hoard found in Cumbria

An unusual late Bronze Age hoard recently discovered in the west of Cumbria is the first of its kind to be found in the county, it is reported. Comprising a penannular bracelet and three lock rings, all made of gold, as well as a fragment of copper alloy, the hoard was found by two metal-detectorists, […]

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Brunswick wreck identified in Bristol Port

The remains of a cargo ship wrecked in the Bristol Channel over 100 years ago have been identified during routine survey. The entire buoyed channel of the Bristol Port Company’s statutory harbour area is surveyed in full over a three-year period, and the area for investigation in 2017 was the Bristol Deep, off the coast […]

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More evidence of ritual cannibalism at Gough’s Cave

It has long been known that the early humans who inhabited Gough’s Cave, Somerset, around 15,000 years ago practised cannibalism and modified certain human remains (such as turning skulls into cups for possibly ceremonial purposes). Now a newly published study focusing on an arm bone from the same assemblage has described evidence for what may […]

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Tudor traces of Greenwich Palace revealed

Work to create a new visitor centre at the Old Royal Naval College has uncovered long-lost traces of Greenwich Palace – the birthplace of Henry VIII and his daughters Mary and Elizabeth I. Although nothing of Greenwich Palace survives above the ground today, its scale and opulence of design were comparable to Hampton Court, with […]

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The new-look Current Archaeology – 16 extra pages!

Issue 320 of Current Archaeology goes on sale today (6 October), boasting a brand new look with even more pages of dedicated archaeological content. You can now immerse yourself in extra pages of features, more book reviews, a new column, and more – we hope you enjoy it!   NEW: Digital Archive Access To celebrate the new […]

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Earliest written reference to London found

The earliest-known written reference to London was revealed today (1 June) by MOLA archaeologists, as part of Britain’s largest, earliest, and most significant group of Roman waxed writing tablets. The reference forms part of an address – Londinio Mogontio, ‘To Mogontius [a Celtic personal name], in London’, and appears on a writing tablet dating from c.AD […]

Bulford skeleton

Prehistoric monuments and 150 Anglo-Saxon graves found at Bulford

Excavations on MOD land in Bulford, Wiltshire, have uncovered 150 Anglo-Saxon graves spanning the later 7th to early 8th century, and a host of prehistoric finds – as well as new insights into early medieval burial practices. Containing the remains of men, women, and children, the burials were arranged in neat rows, packed closely together […]

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