News

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Beautiful beads and a Bronze Age burial mound revealed at Berk Farm

A 4,000-year-old jet necklace comprising over 100 ornate beads has been discovered during the excavation of a Bronze Age burial mound on the Isle of Man. For the past three seasons, archaeologists have been excavating at Berk Farm, near Kirk Michael, as part of the Round Mounds of the Isle of Man project. This initiative […]

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Norse hall discovered on Rousay

A large Viking-Age hall has been discovered during recent excavations at Skaill Farmstead on the island of Rousay, Orkney. Dating to the 10th-12th centuries AD, the outline of the structure was revealed by a team of archaeologists from the University of the Highlands and Islands’ Archaeology Institute, who have been digging at the site for a number of seasons.

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New finds from the Pembrokeshire chariot burial

Recent excavations in an anonymous field in Pembrokeshire have yielded further finds from the late Iron Age chariot burial discovered there last year – the first of its kind to be identified in Wales.

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The Great Dunham torc

What can the first Bronze Age gold torc to be found in Norfolk for 25 years tell us about the influence of the region’s population 3,000 years ago?

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Rethinking Scottish crannogs

New excavation and analysis of three crannogs – or man-made islands – in the Outer Hebrides has clearly demonstrated that they had Neolithic origins, changing our understanding of these enigmatic sites.

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Ordnance from the Battle of Glenshiel revealed

Remnants from the Battle of Glensheil – the Highland battle that ended the 1719 Jacobite Rising and James Francis Edward Stuart’s ambitions of sitting on the throne from which his father, James II and VII, had been deposed – were recently discovered during an excavation marking the 300th anniversary of the battle.

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A handy discovery in Northamptonshire

During excavations at Warth Park in Raunds, Northamptonshire, archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology east made an unusual roman discovery: a wooden arm with an open right hand.

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Science Notes – Calculating historical population fluctuations in Ireland

Previously, large-scale changes in population were quite difficult, if not impossible, to discern from the archaeological record. But while there are still many biases and pitfalls, new statistical techniques are starting to provide innovative ways to determine movement and migration patterns. In this month’s ‘Science Notes’, we explore some of these new techniques, and examine recent research that has utilised them to assess population fluctuations in Ireland.

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