News

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Examining Norman nutrition

A project – led by Dr Elizabeth Craig-Atkins from the University of Sheffield, and Dr Richard Madgwick and Dr Ben Jervis from the University of Cardiff – has examined the impact of the Norman Conquest on diet. Using finds excavated in Oxford and dated to between the 10th and 13th centuries, the team applied a multiproxy analytical approach, combining ceramic residue analysis, isotope analysis of both human and animal bones, incremental isotope analysis of tooth dentine, and palaeopathological analysis of skeletal remains.

Latton-Priory

Medieval fairground found at Latton Priory

A survey of the area around the site of an Augustinian priory near Harlow, Essex, has uncovered the location of an annual medieval fair granted to the priory’s patron by Edward III in 1332.

Viking-waterways

Discovering a lost Viking waterway

New research involving a combination of geophysical mapping, sediment sampling, and the study of place-names has identified a network of waterways that ran through West Mainland Orkney in the Viking and late Norse period.

Wintringham

Iron Age activity at Wintringham Park

Excavations at Wintringham Park, Cambridgeshire, have revealed evidence of ongoing occupation at the site throughout much of the late Iron Age. Located on clayland to the east of St Neots, above the Ouse Valley, the site offers a significant opportunity to enhance our understanding of this region in later prehistory.

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Searching for the Storegga tsunami in Doggerland

The Storegga tsunami, caused by the sudden shift of a Scotland-sized section of the seabed off the coast of modern-day Norway, raged across the North Sea approximately 8,150 years ago. Archaeological evidence for this event has been found in onshore sediments across western Scandinavia, in parts of north-east Britain, and even as far away as Greenland. But, although models of the tsunami suggest that it possibly affected parts of the southern North Sea, no concrete evidence for it had been found in this region – until now.

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New clues at Navan Fort

Recent survey work at Navan Fort, County Armagh, has revealed a series of previously unknown monumental structures from the Iron Age, as well as new evidence of medieval activity.

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From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall

With construction work continuing during the lockdown, the York Archaeological Trust (YAT) has remained busy. Since last September, they have been excavating and monitoring the North Annexe area of the city’s Guildhall during redevelopment of the site by VINCI Construction UK.

Dr-Eleanor-Schofield-(Head-of-Conservation-at-the-Mary-Rose-Trust)-holding-a-sample.-Credit-Diamond-Light-Source

Saving the Mary Rose

Research into the chemical processes that cause wood to degrade over time has uncovered new information vital to the conservation of the wreck of the Mary Rose.

Archaeologists-excavating-the-timber-structure

London’s earliest playhouse?

Excavations in Whitechapel may have uncovered the remains of the first purpose-built Elizabethan playhouse, The Red Lion.

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