News

Wallace2-300x225.jpg

News: Abbey Craig – a burning question

  The hilltop of Abbey Craig is best-known as the site of the National Wallace Monument, which commemorates the 13th-century Battle of Stirling Bridge. But while the Scottish commander William Wallace reportedly watched the armies of Edward I massing from the rocky outcrop before his famous victory in 1297, the site might have witnessed another […]

museums-worcestershire-5-300x225.jpg

News: How do you date a hoard? The case of Bredon Hill

  The chance discovery of a cache of over 3800 Roman coins outside Evesham has raised interesting questions about how accurately we can date finds of this kind.  Hoards are typically found in isolated spots, without other archaeological remains, so their date of burial is usually established by when the latest coin was minted. The […]

Internships

  Here at Current Publishing we often take on interns to help with various parts of the publication process, across all three of our magazines. If you would like to get experience behind the scenes of magazine production, and you’re happy to get stuck in wherever, let us know! Please email a copy of your […]

IMG_8037-MS.jpg

Alderney: A New Roman Fort?

Could an unsung and overgrown site on  the Channel Islands really be one of the  best-preserved military structures surviving  from the Roman period? Jason Monaghan  has been investigating. The tradition that Alderney’s oldest surviving fortification is a small Roman fort has proved persistent. Now known as ‘the Nunnery’, the site lies on a wide, flat […]

31408002-300x222.jpg

Syon Park Services

Roman ‘Service station’ excavated at Syon Park Just 10 miles west of Central London, a Roman service station has been excavated at Syon Park, near Brentford. Just what would a Roman soldier expect to find when he dropped in on his journey to the west country? It is a familiar feeling. You have been on […]

IMG_9009-small-580x386.jpg

News: Human sacrifice in Ireland

Uncovering the secrets of Cashel Man Cashel bog in Co. Laois is locally known as a source of peat moss for farmers and gardeners. But recently the peat millers harvested something rather more unusual: an Iron-Age human sacrifice. Dubbed ‘Cashel Man’, the adult male was found lying on his right side, knees tightly bent up, […]

IMG_4197-580x386.jpg

News: Why a flint arrowhead at a medieval monastery?

Unearthing the personal beliefs of Medieval monks   There are many qualities you might associate with a Medieval monk, but a superstitious belief in elves probably isn’t one of them. Yet a community dig at Kilwinning Abbey in North Ayrshire has uncovered an intriguing clue about the possible personal beliefs of one of the monastery’s […]

Standing-stones2altsmall.jpg

Gathering Time: The Second Radiocarbon Revolution

The publication of Gathering Time marks a turning point in our understanding of the early Neolithic, and a revolution in dating methodology. New radiocarbon techniques have resulted in a more precise chronology for causewayed enclosures in southern Britain and Ireland than was ever thought possible. Christopher Catling summarises 1,000 pages of data to explain why […]

telegraph.jpg

News: Exploring the Lusitania

Archaeologists lead underwater  investigation  to uncover the century-old secrets of RMS Lusitania On May 7th 1915 the Cunard ocean liner RMS Lusitania was nearing the coast of Ireland on the return leg of her 101st voyage between Liverpool and New York. It would prove to be her last. At 14.10pm she was torpedoed by the […]

Cover-picture-small.jpg

Aberdeen's Mither Kirk

Uncovering seven centuries of cemeteries The largest area excavation ever undertaken in Aberdeen has disclosed astonishing details about the Church of St Nicholas, also known as the Mither Kirk, and its congregation. Alison  Cameron, of Cameron Archaeology Ltd, reveals four medieval churches and seven centuries of funerary fashion. In 1874 disaster overtook Aberdeen’s Kirk of […]