Features

03_05

Review – Borderline funny

As an immediately recognisable monument, Hadrian’s Wall has long proved a rich seam of inspiration for cartoonists. Lucia Marchini visited a new exhibition exploring how the frontier can be funny.

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I’ve been on the Pilgrimage!

Current Archaeology’s Editor-in-Chief, Andrew Selkirk, tells all about his recent trip to Hadrian’s Wall. Vindolanda is flourishing. It is unique because it is run by the Vindolanda Trust, and receives no money from the state. Most of the work is done by volunteers, not only in excavating, but also in writing up.

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Excavating the CA archive: The National Trust, 2006 to present

Joe Flatman explores half a century of reports from the past. A selection of articles mentioned by Joe Flatman in this month’s column below can be accessed for free for one month via Exact Editions, from 1 August. Use the links within the text to jump to the individual articles, or click on the covers […]

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Rethinking Scottish crannogs

New excavation and analysis of three crannogs – or man-made islands – in the Outer Hebrides has clearly demonstrated that they had Neolithic origins, changing our understanding of these enigmatic sites.

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Ordnance from the Battle of Glenshiel revealed

Remnants from the Battle of Glensheil – the Highland battle that ended the 1719 Jacobite Rising and James Francis Edward Stuart’s ambitions of sitting on the throne from which his father, James II and VII, had been deposed – were recently discovered during an excavation marking the 300th anniversary of the battle.

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A handy discovery in Northamptonshire

During excavations at Warth Park in Raunds, Northamptonshire, archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology east made an unusual roman discovery: a wooden arm with an open right hand.

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Science Notes – Calculating historical population fluctuations in Ireland

Previously, large-scale changes in population were quite difficult, if not impossible, to discern from the archaeological record. But while there are still many biases and pitfalls, new statistical techniques are starting to provide innovative ways to determine movement and migration patterns. In this month’s ‘Science Notes’, we explore some of these new techniques, and examine recent research that has utilised them to assess population fluctuations in Ireland.

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