Features

Doggerland

Doggerland rises: exploring lands and livelihoods lost under the North Sea

The dramatic impact of flooding on modern British communities was all too clear at the start of this year. But how did our prehistoric predecessors respond to the inundations that transformed their surroundings and drove them from their homes at the end of the last Ice Age? Jim Leary reports. The recent flood of desperate […]

111435 (2)

A model monarch: Richard III’s grave recreated in 3D

One year after Richard III’s reinterment, the University of Leicester has released a 3D interactive representation of the king’s grave and skeleton. Created by University of Leicester Archaeological Services (ULAS), who excavated the Greyfriars site where Richard III had been laid to rest, the fully rotatable computer model shows the king’s remains in situ as they were […]

carlton-feat

The mystery in the marsh: Exploring an Anglo-Saxon island at Little Carlton

In May 2014, Current Archaeology reported on the discovery of a plaque inscribed with the name of an Anglo-Saxon woman, ‘Cudburg’, at Little Carlton near Louth, Lincolnshire. The site has since emerged as one of the most important high-status settlements yet found in the region. Peter Townend, Hugh Willmott, Adam Daubney, and Graham Vickers explain […]

crossrail-feat

Fast track to the past: Celebrating Crossrail’s archaeology

The construction of the capital’s new railway, Crossrail, through the heart of London resulted in one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever undertaken. With the digs just complete, what have been the highlights? Nadia Durrani reports. In December 2015, after six years in the field, the final trowel hit the ground in the Crossrail […]

Hadrians-Wall

Hadrian’s Wall: 40 Years of Frontier Research

Current Archaeology Live!  presents a special conference, in partnership with Durham University: Hadrian’s Wall: 40 Years of Frontier Research 2-4 September 2016, at Durham University Join us in September for a conference celebrating one of Britain’s greatest archaeological treasures. Hadrian’s Wall is the most famous example of a Roman frontier, but it is also the most mysterious. Far more massive […]

Mersea cremation

The fragrant dead: How to treat your dead, the Roman way

Within Roman society, highly aromatic resins were important in ritual activity, and sometimes even applied directly to the body at death. But did this sacred rite ever reach the remote province of Britannia? Bradford University’s Rhea Brettell and Carl Heron launched a project to discover more. To the Romans, frankincense, myrrh, and other fragrant resins […]

britons-abroad-feat

Britons Abroad

The untold story of emigration and object mobility from Roman Britain Britons are traditionally believed to have taken scant advantage of the opportunities to travel that the Roman Empire presented. But do tantalising clusters of brooches tell a different story? Tatiana Ivleva has gone in search of the Britons abroad. Sometime around AD 80, two […]

mucking-feat

Writing Mucking: lives in land

Current Archaeology normally features dirt archaeology, but archaeologists today often excavate archives as well – that is to say, they are engaged in digging into the archives in order to publish definitive accounts of past excavations. Here Christopher Evans and Sam Lucy give us an idea of the challenges they faced in completing the last […]

Volunteers investigating Thornliebank house and tea room at Rouken Glen Park, East Renfrewshire

Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival

September is a momentous month for Scottish archaeology. It opens with delegates gathering for the prestigious European Association of Archaeologists conference in Glasgow, and then launches into the inaugural Scottish Archaeology and Heritage Festival. Lesley McEwan guides us through some of the events on offer. It is with great excitement that we will launch the […]

Holt1

Holt Castle restored to royal glory

Holt Castle in Denbighshire, northeast Wales, was built under Edward I and later served as Richard II’s treasury but today its royal connections are far from obvious. Plundered for stone to build the 17th century Eaton Hall in Cheshire, the once-mighty fortification has been reduced to overgrown ruins. Now, however, a Castle Studies Trust-funded project […]