Features

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From Augustinians to Eboracum at York Guildhall

With construction work continuing during the lockdown, the York Archaeological Trust (YAT) has remained busy. Since last September, they have been excavating and monitoring the North Annexe area of the city’s Guildhall during redevelopment of the site by VINCI Construction UK.

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Scipio Africanus’ gravestone

Damage to statues and other monuments has made for heated headlines and sharply divided opinions this summer. One act seems particularly heinous, however: the deliberate destruction of a grave marker commemorating ‘Scipio Africanus’, an enslaved black teenager who died in Bristol in 1720.

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Saving the Mary Rose

Research into the chemical processes that cause wood to degrade over time has uncovered new information vital to the conservation of the wreck of the Mary Rose.

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Heritage from home – August

As many heritage sites and museums begin to open their doors again, you may be looking forward to getting back out there, but there is still a huge selection of resources available for the occasions where you would rather get your heritage fix from the comfort of your sofa. Amy Brunskill selects some of the latest ways to get involved in archaeology and heritage at home, as well as giving a summary of some of the sites that you can now visit in person.

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Provenancing the stones

Where did the Stonehenge bluestones come from? Scientific advances are allowing us to pinpoint the outcrops that they were quarried from with ever-greater accuracy. Rob Ixer, Richard Bevins, and Duncan Pirrie describe some of the latest thinking.

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London’s earliest playhouse?

Excavations in Whitechapel may have uncovered the remains of the first purpose-built Elizabethan playhouse, The Red Lion.

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All in the family: genetic links in prehistoric Ireland

A project, headed by researchers from Trinity College Dublin, has sequenced the DNA of more than 40 individuals excavated from both Mesolithic and Neolithic funerary contexts across Ireland. The results illuminate not only the Irish transition to an agrarian way of life but also the social hierarchies that might have formed during this time.

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Monumental discovery at Durrington Walls

Archaeological investigations 3km from Stonehenge have revealed a series of massive pits possibly representing a late Neolithic circular boundary centred on the Durrington Walls ‘superhenge’.

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