Features

1 - Globe Theatre

Shakespeare's first theatre

Shakespeare is associated mainly with the Globe and the South Bank. But most of his early plays were first performed at a playhouse in Shoreditch called simply ‘The Theatre’. Museum of London archaeologists think they have just found it.

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Celtic Art and Tourist Knick Knacks

Enamelled bronzes from Roman Britain have turned up all over the Roman world.  This poses an interesting question: were Celtic artists making tourist knick knacks for Roman soldiers to take back home? Leading expert Ernst Künzl puts a British ‘souvenir’ into context.

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Chiswick House

English Heritage archaeologists have recently had a rare chance to investigate Britain’s first ‘Palladian’ country house – Chiswick House in West London.

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Roundhouses

 In 1970, writing in CA 21, architect-turned archaeologist Chris Musson estimated that there were perhaps 200 roundhouses known in archaeological literature. The result of recent work is that now, 30 years after Musson’s estimate, we can suggest that the number of excavated roundhouses in Britain must be rapidly approaching 4,000 – a staggering 20-fold increase […]

Lost and Found: Conesby Moat

The moated site at North, or Little, Conesby was seen as being one of Scunthorpe’s ‘most charming beauty spots’.  It was probably built by the d’Arcy family who owned the manor for over 300 years after acquiring it in the aftermath of the Norman Conquest.

Cod Bones and Commerce

Historical sources show that the expansion of cod fishing from the 15th century onward played in important role in European colonisation of the North-West Atlantic. It is also known that fishing was important earlier in the medieval period, but the records usually go back no further than the 12th century at the earliest. By then, […]

Roman Britain's Great Plague?

{mosimage}When archaeologists began work at 120-122 London Road, Gloucester, in August 2004, it was the site of a disused service station.  Oxford Archaeology had been called in to excavate what was known to be part of the Wotton cemetery, one of several on the roads leading out of Roman Gloucester. .

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Gwithian: Dark Age secrets from the dunes

Interviewed by The Cornishman in 1954 shortly after setting up his excavation at Gwithian, Charles Thomas, a young graduate of the Institute of Archaeology in London, explained his ambition: ‘A dig such as this, systematically developed through the years, is going to provide a background to Cornish history such as has never been worked through […]

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The Silent Shores Speak

North Argyll is a landscape dominated by the sea and, until the recent past, its inhabitants viewed it from a predominantly maritime perspective. Dr Colin Martin shares 30 years of research into this coastal environment.