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Excavating the CA Archive: CA 321

Joe Flatman delves into half a century of reports from the past.
From the very first edition, Current Archaeology has maintained some distinctive characteristics. Chief among these are the cover-story photographs and associated back-cover maps locating the sites featured in each edition. In my second article examining the CA archive, I’m focusing on some of the stories behind these iconic cover images. To do that, I’ve picked out some of my personal favourites from the first 100 editions, covering the years 1967 to 1986. Do let CA know about your own favourites from the more than 300 covers that exist, and any anecdotes that you may have associated to them.

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Peterborough Archaeology

Peterborough and its surrounding area has been an important centre for settlement, industry and trade for many thousands of years. Under the “Peterborough Archaeology” banner the local amateur archaeology group, FRAG, provides a focal point for all things archaeological in the area. The group runs a programme of lectures, visits, and workshops, and provides training […]

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Current Archaeology Live! 2018

Save the Date! 23-24 February 2018 Current Archaeology Live! 2018 will be returning to the University of London’s Senate House, on 23-24 February (Friday/Saturday). We will be hearing from the foremost archaeological experts on the latest finds and ground-breaking research, and we are looking forward to an entertaining, stimulating, and enjoyable two days – we […]

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Beating London’s bodysnatchers

Archaeological work under the Crossrail project has uncovered evidence of bodysnatching in the City of London. Construction of the capital’s new Elizabeth Line has created one of the most extensive archaeological programmes ever undertaken in the UK (see CA 313 and 327), and work on the Broadgate entrance to the new Crossrail station at Liverpool […]

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Multiplying Lufton fishes

The first project to excavate at Lufton Roman villa since the 1960s has revealed new details of the Somerset site’s famous octagonal fish mosaic. Surrounding a deep pool that has been variously interpreted as an ostentatious bath, a Christian baptistery, or part of an impressive suite of reception rooms, the elaborate 4th-century floor was first […]

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Pictish longhouse unearthed at Burghead Fort?

Burghead Fort, near Lossiemouth in Moray, is thought to have been a significant Pictish seat of power, being the biggest fort of its type in Scotland. However, it was long believed that the site had been largely destroyed by 19th-century development. Now archaeological work has revealed the presence of a surviving building with intact floor […]

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Rescuing the Rooswijk

An international team of maritime archaeologists is working to excavate and record the remains of the Rooswijk, an at-risk Dutch wreck off the coast of Kent. The vessel was built in Amsterdam for the Dutch East India Company in 1737, but sank on the treacherous Goodwin Sands in 1740 while sailing for Batavia (modern Jakarta). […]

Unusual Bronze Age hoard found in Cumbria

An unusual late Bronze Age hoard recently discovered in the west of Cumbria is the first of its kind to be found in the county, it is reported. Comprising a penannular bracelet and three lock rings, all made of gold, as well as a fragment of copper alloy, the hoard was found by two metal-detectorists, […]

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Brunswick wreck identified in Bristol Port

The remains of a cargo ship wrecked in the Bristol Channel over 100 years ago have been identified during routine survey. The entire buoyed channel of the Bristol Port Company’s statutory harbour area is surveyed in full over a three-year period, and the area for investigation in 2017 was the Bristol Deep, off the coast […]

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More evidence of ritual cannibalism at Gough’s Cave

It has long been known that the early humans who inhabited Gough’s Cave, Somerset, around 15,000 years ago practised cannibalism and modified certain human remains (such as turning skulls into cups for possibly ceremonial purposes). Now a newly published study focusing on an arm bone from the same assemblage has described evidence for what may […]

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